GXmap: User's guide

Copyright (C) 2008-2009 Anders Gavare

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How to use GXmap

General mode

When you start GXmap, you will see a 3D globe view of the world.

Screenshot (click to enlarge).

Note that tiles are not included in the GXmap program itself, but downloaded on demand via the Internet. The first time you run GXmap, it will most likely take a couple of seconds (or maybe even a minute), before a high-resolution image can be rendered.

(Note as of release 1.5: Only OpenStreetMap tiles are downloaded in high resolution; the 5400x2700 pixel NASA satellite image is static, and no higher resolution image will be downloaded automatically.)

Interaction:


Ham mode

The Ham (amateur radio) mode is entered by choosing Ham in the Mode menu. In Ham mode, you will see multiple views of the world map. The leftmost (main) view is the Azimuthal equidistant projection, the top right view is a traditional 3D globe, and the bottom right view is a plane 2D view with simple x,y = long,lat projection.

Screenshot (click to enlarge).

Below the 2D map, there are settings for QTH (home location), the other station's location (if any), and a zoom slider.

When a shortest path between two locations has been calculated, the status bar shows the direction (where 0 degrees is North, 90 degrees is East) and distance in km.


Configuring map layers

There are two ways to reach the map layers configuration. The first is through the Edit menu:

The second way is to right-click in a map visualization:

Currently, if there are multiple map visualizations, they all use the same layer configuration.

The available layers are:


Using GXmap with a GPS

Starting with release 1.3 of GXmap, GPS coordinates can be read from gpsd. The procedure for installing and running gpsd varies depending on operating system.

GXmap must be built with support for libgps. Usually, this is accomplished by building GXmap after installing gpsd, or alternatively, it may have been taken care of by a package maintainer (if you installed GXmap as a prebuilt package).

Examples using a USB-to-serial GPS device, such as a SiRF Navibe GM720:

Whenever GXmap receives new GPS coordinates from gpsd, it updates the location of a green cross to those coordinates. (Loosing the GPS fix will not remove the green cross, however. It will just stay where it was last updated.)


Note (2009-05-22): At the time of writing this, there's a locale related bug in libgps/gpsd 2.38, which causes longitude and latitude to be truncated to whole integer values, for example when using a Swedish locale. If you experience this, as a temporary workaround, try running GXmap using an English locale:

	$ LANG=en gxmap